Chris Hadfield quotes
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Chris Hadfield Quotes



Quotes by Chris Hadfield - (29 quotes)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Accomplishment category:

No one ever accomplished anything great sitting down. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Choices category:

Life off Earth is in two important respects not at all unworldly: you can choose to focus on the surprises and pleasures, or the frustrations. And you can choose to appreciate the smallest scraps of experience, the everyday moments, or to value only the grandest, most stirring ones. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Collaboration category:

You can't change the bricks, and together, you still have to build a wall. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Communication category:

In any new situation... you will almost certainly be viewed in one of three ways. As a minus one: actively harmful, someone who creates problems. Or as a zero: your impact is neutral and doesn't tip the balance one way or the other. Or you'll be seen as a plus one: someone who actively adds value. Everyone wants to be a plus one, of course. But proclaiming your plus-oneness at the outset almost guarantees you'll be perceived as a minus one, regardless of the skills you bring to the table or how you actually perform. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Competence category:

Competence means keeping your head in a crisis, sticking with a task even when it seems hopeless, and improvising good solutions to tough problems when every second counts. It encompasses ingenuity, determination and being prepared for anything. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Competition category:

It's not enough to shelve your own competitive streak. You have to try, consciously, to help others succeed. Some people feel this is like shooting themselves in the foot - why aid someone else in creating a competitive advantage? I don't look at it that way. Helping someone else look good doesn't make me look worse. In fact, it often improves my own performance, particularly in stressful situations. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Courage category:

People tend to think astronauts have the courage of a superhero - or maybe the emotional range of a robot. But in order to stay calm in a high-stress, high-stakes situation, all you really need is knowledge. Sure, you might still feel a little nervous or stressed or hyper-alert. But what you won't feel is terrified. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Criticism category:

In any field, it's a plus if you view criticism as potentially helpful advice rather than as a personal attack. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Danger category:

Our training pushes us to develop a new set of instincts: instead of reacting to danger with a fight-or-flight adrenaline rush, we're trained to respond unemotionally by immediately prioritizing threats and methodically seeking to defuse them. We go from wanting to bolt for the exit to wanting to engage and understand what's going wrong, then fix it. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Deception category:

Sweat the small stuff. Without letting anyone see you sweat. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Destiny category:

Don't let life randomly kick you into the adult you don't want to become. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Earth category:

Loneliness... has very little to do with location. It's a state of mind. In the centre of every city are some of the loneliest people in the world... because our whole planet was just outside the window, I felt even more... connected to the seven billion other people... (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Education category:

- An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth...
To me, it's simple: if you've got the time, use it to get ready. What else could you possibly have to do that's more important? Yes, maybe you'll learn how to do a few things you'll never wind up actually needing to do, but that's a much better problem to have than needing to do something and having no clue where to start. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Failure category:

If you start thinking that only your biggest and shiniest moments count, you're setting yourself up to feel like a failure most of the time. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Fear category:

- An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth...
In my experience, fear comes from not knowing what to expect and not feeling you have any control over what's about to happen. When you feel helpless, you're far more afraid than you would be if you knew the facts. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Happiness category:

You can choose to focus on the surprises and pleasures, or the frustrations. And you can choose to appreciate the smallest scraps of experience, the everyday moments, or to value only the grandest, most stirring ones. Ultimately, the real question is whether you want to be happy. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Journey category:

Focus on the journey, not on arriving at a certain destination. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Leadership category:

Good leadership means leading the way, not hectoring other people to do things your way. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Materials category:

We broke into Mir using a Swiss Army knife. Never leave the planet without one. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Optimism category:

My optimism and confidence come not from feeling I'm luckier than other mortals, and they sure don't come from visualizing victory. They're the result of a lifetime spent visualizing defeat and figuring out how to prevent it. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Preparation category:

Preparation is not only about managing external risks, but about limiting the likelihood that you'll unwittingly add to them. When you're the author of your own fate, you don't want to write a tragedy. Aside from anything else, the possibility of a sequel is nonexistent. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Profession category:

-An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth...
Square astronaut, round hole. But somehow, I'd managed to push myself through it, and here was the truly amazing part: along the way, I'd become a good fit. It had only taken 21 years. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Rewards category:

Early success is a terrible teacher. You're essentially being rewarded for a lack of preparation, so when you find yourself in a situation where you must prepare, you can't do it. You don't know how. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Senses category:

It's like being a newborn, this sudden sensory overload of noise, color, smells and gravity after months of quietly floating, encased in relative calm and isolation. No wonder babies cry in protest when they're born. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Skill category:

When you have some skills but don't fully understand your environment, there is no way you can be a plus one. At best, you can be a zero. But a zero isn't a bad thing to be. You're competent enough not to create problems or make more work for everyone else. And you have to be competent, and prove to others that you are, before you can be extraordinary. There are no short-cuts, unfortunately. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Sleep category:

-An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth...
Wow, that was a really good sleep. I feel great. Hmm, that sounds like someone on the radio; maybe I'm still dreaming. Weird - the guy sounds a bit like Denis. Wait a sec. That is Denis. What's going on? Am I in an airplane? (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Success category:

Success is feeling good about the work you do throughout the long, unheralded journey that may or may not wind up at the launch pad. You can't view training solely as a stepping stone to something loftier. It's got to be an end in itself. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Universe category:

Waiting for him I check behind me, to be sure I haven't accidentally activated my backup tank of oxygen, and that's when I notice the universe. The scale is graphically shocking. The colors, too. The incongruity is stupefying: there I was, inside a small box, but now - how is this possible? (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)

Chris Hadfield, astronaut - From the Work category:

-An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth...
It's almost comical that astronauts are stereotyped as daredevils and cowboys. As a rule, we're highly methodical and detail-oriented. Our passion isn't for thrills but for the grindstone, and pressing our noses to it. (Chris Hadfield, astronaut)